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May Their Shadows Never Shrink:
Wole Soyinka and the Oxford Professorship
of Poetry
Edited by Ivor Agyeman-Duah and Lucy Newlyn

Published: August 2016

ISBN: 978-0-9928436-7-0

Price: £9.99

 

About the Book

This important book documents stimulating and engaging reflections and thoughts from international writers and commentators who collectively validate and establish Soyinka as more than deserving of the honour of the Oxford Professorship of Poetry. The co-editors Ivor Agyeman-Duah and Lucy Newlyn campaigned for the election of Soyinka and provide insightful analyses of the campaign while arguing for electoral reform. This is a must-read for anyone interested in the future of world literature and inclusiveness.

 

Key Selling Points

  • An important volume documenting the campaign and features an impressive list of contributors from international writers and commentators expressing their views about why the Oxford Professorship of Poetry position matters and why Wole Soyinka would be a fitting winner.
  • The book provides stimulating and engaging reflections that validate and establish Wole Soyinka as more than deserving of the honour of the position.
  • The volume acknowledges the multi-faceted aspects of Soyinka’s character including his activism and argues that, the opportunity for Soyinka at Oxford would enrich the international credentials of the University and the country.
  • This volume will appeal to studies on African Writing, World Literature, African Culture and History, as well as  the ordinary reader.

About the Editors

Ivor Agyeman-Duah is Development Policy Advisor to The Lumina Foundation, administrators of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa and was chair of the Literature Jury for the Millennium Excellence Foundation.

Lucy Newlyn is Professor of English and Literature at Oxford University and a Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

CONTENTS PAGE

Foreword

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Introduction

CHAPTER ONE

The Endorsements for Professorship of Poetry

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, novelist

Benjamin Zephaniah, poet

Ben Okri, poet and novelist

Rowan Williams, poet and former Archbishop of Canterbury

Clare Algar, Chief Executive of Reprieve

David Constantine, poet and scholar

Tom Paulin, poet and critic

Stephen Chan OBE, PhD, Professor of World Politics, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Robert J.C. Young, Julius Silver Professor of English and Comparative Literature, New York University (formerly Professor of English and Critical Theory, Oxford University)

Gabriel Josipovici, novelist and critic

Andrew McNeillie, poet and literary editor

Ken Macdonald QC, Warden of Wadham College, Oxford

Gerard Smyth, Irish poet, poetry editor of The Irish Times and member of Ireland's Academy of Arts and Letters, Aosdana

Ato Quayson, Professor of English, University of Toronto

Shami Chakrabari, Director of Liberty

Oxford University Students’ Union (OUSU) Executive Committee

Elyse Dodgson, International Director, Royal Court Theatre

Robert Macfarlane, scholar and writer

Rita Dove (Former Poet Laureate of the United States)

Alastair Niven, formerly Director-General of the Africa Centre in London, Director of Literature at the Arts Council and Director of Literature at the British Council

Michael Schmidt, poet, author, scholar and publisher

Amit Chaudhuri (Professor of English and Novelist)

Carmen Bugan, poet

Jahan Ramazani, University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English, University of Virginia

Tamsin Oglesby, playwright

Natalya Din-Kariuki, Rhodes Scholar, University of Oxford

Henry Louis Gates, Jr, The Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University

Wole Soyinka’s Poetry: The Insistence on Liberty

Carmen Bugan

CHAPTER TWO

The Election

Lucy Newlyn

CHAPTER THREE

A Poet of Witness in the World

Ivor Agyeman-Duah

CHAPTER FOUR

On the Island of Poetry: Literary Awards and the Canonization of African Creativity

Tiziana Morosetti

CHAPTER FIVE

Lost Poetic Opportunity

1.  Had Wole Soyinka Come to Oxford

Peter J. King

2.  The Oxford Gig

Kole Odutola

3.  Soyinka the Bold

Jenny Lewis

4.  Rage Against Age

Kole Odutola

5.  The Repetition

Lucy Newlyn

Editors and Contributors

Acknowledgements

Works Cited

 

All The Good Things Around Us:
An Anthology of African Short Stories

Edited by Ivor Agyeman-Duah
Published: August 2016

ISBN: 978-0-9928436-6-3

Price: £12.00

 

About the Book

This collection edited by Ivor Agyeman-Duah is an important and timely publication that brings together bright voices comprising budding and accomplished African writers under one roof.  The collection is dynamic and engaging in covering different experiences within Africa and its Diaspora. There are stories of harrowing experiences that document human interaction that are emotionally charged and full of pain and sadness. However, there are also several life-affirming narratives throughout the collection that give hope to the possibilities of human bonding in multiple and appealing ways and bear testimony to the ultimate power of human goodness. The writers are skilled artisans who display their dexterity in the way that they deploy language and images to engage their readers’ attention and imagination

Key Selling Points

  • An important volume of new short stories from some of the most eloquent and gifted voices from Africa, capturing these moments of critical cultural shift and existential questioning.
  • The book provides stimulating and engaging reflections on the contemporary state of African writing on identity and the limitless imaginings of our futures.
  • The collection captures the range, diversity and richness in wisdom and imaginings of current writing and projects a positive future for African writing.
  • This collection will appeal to studies on African Writing, World Literature and African Culture and History, as well as the ordinary reader.

About the Editor

Ivor Agyeman-Duah was the inaugural curator of The John A. Kufuor Foundation Museum and Presidential Library. He is also the Development Policy Advisor to The Lumina Foundation, administrators of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa and was chair of the Literature Jury for the Millennium Excellence Foundation. He has edited several volumes on the culture, history, literature and economic development of Ghana and Africa.

All The Good Things Around Us: An Anthology of African Short Stories

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword

Wole Soyinka

Prologue: As Clouds Pass Above Our Heads

Ben Okri

Introduction

Ivor Agyeman-Duah

CHAPTER ONE

Rebellion

Ama Ata Aidoo

CHAPTER TWO

Unsuitable Ties

Sefi Atta

CHAPTER THREE

Dead Leaves on the Beautiful River

Ivor Agyeman-Duah

CHAPTER FOUR

Happiness

Chika Unigwe

CHAPTER FIVE

Tunnels and Hidden Passes

Ogochukwu Promise

CHAPTER SIX

Driver

Taiye Selasi

CHAPTER SEVEN

The Woman in the Wood

Irehobhude O. Iyioha

CHAPTER EIGHT

These Fragments

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

CHAPTER NINE

Feely-Feely

Ama Ata Aidoo

CHAPTER TEN

The Brick

Tsitsi Dangarembga

CHAPTER ELEVEN

Transition to Glory

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

CHAPTER TWELVE

The Son

Ivor Agyeman-Duah

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

New Mom

Tope Folarin

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

…. And the dog lay there dying …

Martin Egblewogbe

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

The Skull in the Garden

Peggy Appiah

CHAPTER SIXTEEN

Money Matter

Yaba Badoe

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

Sahara Desert

Ogochukwu Promise

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

Back Home

Monica Arac de Nyeko

CHAPTER NINETEEN

Exchanging the Crown Someday for Exile

Faustin Kagame

CHAPTER TWENTY

In Astove of the Seychelles Islands

Wendy Day Veevers-Carter

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE

One Good Turn

Nadya Somoe

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO

From Chibok to Sambisa

Ogochukwu Promise

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE

It’s Something that Happens To Other People

Irehobhude O. Iyioha

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR

The Scent of African Dust

Benjamin Sehene

CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE

Cordelia Thukudza’s List

Ellen Banda-Aaku

CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX

The Rhinos’ Child

Bridget Pitt

CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN

Sahara

Shadreck Chikoti

CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT

The Codicil

Ivor Agyeman-Duah

Biographies of Contributors

Acknowledgements

 

 

Essays in Honour of Wole Soyinka at 80

Edited by Ivor Agyeman-Duah and Ogochukwu Promise
Published  2 May 2014
ISBN:  978-0-9569307-9-8
Price: £20.00


 

About the Book

Essays In Honour of Wole Soyinka at 80, edited by two award-winning African writers is a celebration of the literary life of Wole Soyinka at an important stage in his life. The volume provides the most extensive anthology ever produced on Africa’s first Nobel Laureate in Literature and features 30 essays with a foreword by the former Secretary-General of the Commonwealth, Chief Emeka Anyaoku. With contributions from three Nobel Laureates: Toni Morrison, Nadine Gordimer and Derek Walcott and other contributions from African leaders, scholars, writers and literary critics from around the world, they assess Soyinka’s perspectives on power, politics and the arts to create dialogue and debate. Diverse aspects of his life are reflected in six themes in this volume that also documents the literary and cultural histories of West Africa from the 1950s to the present day.  The Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o describes Soyinka as: “A writer and public intellectual, who has voiced his concerns over major happenings in different parts of the continent over the last fifty years and more, Soyinka has become the moral and democratic conscience of Africa”.

Back Cover Blurbs

I am permanently grateful for his gifts. Wole Soyinka makes the world intelligible.
-Toni Morrison, Nobel Laureate in Literature and Robert F. Goheen Professor at Princeton University.

As for serving the need for justice, Wole Soyinka went further than words.
-Nadine Gordimer, Nobel Laureate in Literature.

As a writer and public intellectual who has voiced his concerns over major happenings in different parts of the continent over the last fifty years and more, he has become the moral and democratic conscience of Africa.
-Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Director, International Centre for Writing and Translation, University of California, Irvine.

-Soyinka works magic with the English language... but it also throws into focus the predicament of modern African writers.
-Ama Ata Aidoo, Writer and Scholar on Gender & Developmental Issues and Executive Director of Mbaasem, Ghana.

-Soyinka is often compared favourably to his direct antecedents, Euripides and Shakespeare, Yeats and Synge, Brecht and Lorca. Statements such as this sound necessarily hyperbolic, no doubt. But it is impossible not to make such comparison when one searches for a meaningful comparison of Soyinka’s craft with Western writers.
-Henry Louis Gates Jr., Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University.

-He is part of what is positive in the postcolonial generation.
-Ali A. Mazrui, Director, Institute of Global Cultural Studies, State University of New York.

Soyinka forces us to sometimes see our own unpleasant images in the mirror.
-John Dramani Mahama, President, Republic of Ghana.

We are privileged ever to interact with those who bear the burden of our admiration.
-Margaret Busby OBE, Writer, Editor, Critic, Publisher and Broadcaster, UK.

About the Editors
Ivor Agyeman-Duah:  Director of the Centre for Intellectual Renewal in Ghana is an Advisor to The Lumina Foundation in Lagos, Nigeria, Administrators of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa.

Ogochukwu Promise: Founder of The Lumina Foundation, Administrators of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa and its Chief Executive is an award winning novelist, poet and painter.

 

Africa Beyond the Mirror
By Boubacar Boris Diop
Translated from the French 
by Vera Wülfing-Leckie and Caroline Beschea-Fache

Publication Date: 22nd May 2014
ISBN: 978-0-9569307-5-0

Price:£16.99

About the Book

page1image6736

The media tend to portray Africa in a manner that grossly distorts reality. The picture they paint is intended to make people of African descent feel ashamed of their past and their identity. This is unacceptable and must change. It is therefore a moral imperative for all those who can make themselves heard, to speak out.

These texts reflect the point of view of an African intellectual who has selected them for this book since they were all born out of the desire to tell the truth as it is.

Besides chapters that pay homage to Cheikh Anta Diop and Mongo Beti, the wide variety of topics in this book includes the dilemma of the writer who is stuck between two languages, the shipwreck of the Joola in Senegal, the continuing waves of migration towards Europe and the cultural challenges of globalization.

The genocide of the Tutsis in Rwanda, which too many people are still trying to deny, has been given special importance. The implication of the French government is stressed, because its responsibility in this tragedy, via François Mitterrand, is neither well-known nor accepted, despite all the irrefutable evidence.

Projecting one’s gaze beyond the mirror means trying to expose the lies that hide behind so many clichés that are common currency about Africa. Above all, it means ringing the alarm bell as a warning against the sinister political intentions that feed a growing Afrophobia.

Key Selling Points

  • Diop’s Africa Beyond the Mirror is a must read for anyone interested in the developmental aspects of Africa and the hidden hands behind these conflicts. These essays are aimed at projecting one’s gaze beyond the mirror to expose the many clichés that are common currency about Africa as a caution against the political intentions that feed a growing pessimism about Africa.

  • The volume interrogates the portrayal of Africa in the international media by questioning the motives of outside forces in fuelling continuing conflicts by citing the Rwandan genocide as an example and France’s involvement as the foreign hand in collusion with misguided African rulers.

  • This book will contribute valuable insights into African identity on courses in Francophone Literature, African History, Developmental Studies, Social Anthropology, Cultural Studies, International Relations and Immigrant Studies as well as Diasporic and Transnational Studies internationally.

    About the Author

    The Senegalese author Boubacar Boris Diop is one of Africa’s major contemporary writers. From Murambi, the Book of Bones, to Kaveena, his work is a meditation on the human condition across the tragedies and the hopes of the black continent.

 

 

Chinua Achebe: Tributes and Reflections

Edited by Nana Ayebia Clarke MBE & James Currey

Publication Date: 30th March 2014
ISBN:
978-0-9569307-6-7

Price: £20.00

 

 

About the Book

The news of Chinua Achebe’s death in the US on 22 March 2013, in the middle of the 39th Annual African Literature Association Conference in Charleston, South Carolina sent shock waves through the African and world literary communities. Renowned as Africa’s most famous novelist and the founding father of modern African writing in English, the publication of his first novel Things Fall Apart under the Heinemann imprint of the African Writers Series, not only contested European narratives about Africa but also challenged traditional assumptions about the form and function of the novel. His writing career spanned over fifty years, from the publication of Things Fall Apart (1958) to There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra (2012), his memoir of the Nigeria Biafra war in the 1960s.

Nobel Laureates Wole Soyinka, Toni Morrison and Nadine Gordimer lead an international chorus of tributes to Chinua Achebe’s writing and legacy. The volume features 49 contributors and includes a host of other distinguished writers, critics, scholars and publishers in paying tribute to his literary life, anchoring it within his activism and mediatory role as a great spokesman and defender of Africa.

It was Nadine Gordimer who expressed so well her pleasure that her obituary, published in Johannesburg and London, would appear ‘in the more permanent form of a book… along with the contributions of my comrade writers in the world in honouring of Chinua Achebe.’

The book will be published by Ayebia Clarke Publishing Limited at the end of March 2014 and launched at the 40th African Literature Association (ALA) Conference, in April 9-13, 2014, at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in South Africa.

 

Chinua Achebe: Tributes and Reflections

Edited by Nana Ayebia Clarke MBE and James Currey

Contents

Acknowledgements


1. A Tribute: Once More for Chinua Achebe!
Nana Ayebia Clarke

2. Preface
Nana Ayebia Clarke and James Currey

3. Chinua Achebe (1930-2013): Obituary, Founding father of African fiction whose novels chronicled Nigeria’s troubled history (first published 22.03.2013: The Guardian)
Lyn Innes

4. Profile: Chinua Achebe – Storyteller of the Savannah (first published 18.11.2000, The Guardian)
Maya Jaggi

5. Elegy for a Nation (For Chinua Achebe, at Seventy)
Wole Soyinka

6. Chinua Achebe: African American Institute Award: (9.22.00)
Toni Morrison

7. Chinua Achebe
Nadine Gordimer

8. Chinua Achebe as Publisher
James Currey

9. Remembering Chinua Achebe
Henry Chakava

10. Chinua Achebe: The Spirit Lives
Ngugi wa Thiong’o

11. Far From Ogidi: Diary of a Belated Encounter
Simon Gikandi

12. ‘A’ is for Achebe
Margaret Busby

13. Chinua Achebe (1930–2013) A Summing-Up
F. Abiola Irele


14. Remembering Chinua
Ama Ata Aidoo

15. The Assault on Culture: Achebe on the Crisis of Identity in Colonial Africa
Emmanuel Akyeampong

16. “I Haven’t Seen You in 400 Years!”: Chinua Achebe and African American Writing
Anne V. Adams

17. Chinua Achebe at 82: We Remember Differently
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

18. Chinua Achebe: A Writer and a Half and More
Akin Adesokan

19. Reflections on Chinua Achebe: A Priceless Encounter with A Gentle Voice
Zaynab Alkali

20. “Odupon Kesee Atutu.”(A Great Tree Has Fallen. Asante-Twi)
Kwame Anthony Appiah

21. Chinua Achebe: A Dissenting Opinion
Ibrahim Bello-Kano

22. From Achebe to Adichie
Carole Boyce Davies

23. A Poet Daughter’s Farewell: Still Morning Yet
Abena P. A. Busia

24. Chinua Achebe and the Matrix of Womanhood
Helen Chukwuma

25. The Casualties
J. P. Clark-Bekederemo

26. Chinua Achebe: Some Reflections
Anani Dzidzienyo

27. In Memoriam: Morning, March 22, 2013, Charleston, South Carolina
Maureen Ngozi Eke

28. Chinua Achebe: The Passing of a Comet
Ernest N. Emenyonu

29. Ugo Chara Acha Adighi Echu Echu: The Path to Achebe’s Undying Legacy
Toyin Falola

30. A Wake for the Storyteller (For Chinua Achebe)
Harry Oludare Garuba

31. An Interview with Chinua Achebe
Helon Habila

32. Chinua Achebe: His Wondrous Passages
Biodun Jeyifo

33. Memories of Chinua Achebe
G. Douglas Killam

Achebe in Texas
Bernth Lindfors

35. Things Fall Apart Revisited: The Poetry and the Prose
Ali A. Mazrui

36. Celebrating Achebe’s Utu and Creative Genius in Oracy, Orature and Literature
Mĩcere Gĩthae Mũgo

37. Reading Chinua Achebe: Footholds in the Flood of History
Njabulo S. Ndebele

38. Chinua Achebe: A Legend and Master Storyteller
Okey Ndibe

39. The Achebe Thread
Alaistair Niven

40. For Chinua Achebe
Odia Ofeimun

41. What Chinua Achebe Never Heard From Me
Kole Omotoso

42. The Discombobulation of a Rookie Patriot: A Stage Adaptation of Chinua Achebe’s A Man of the People
Femi Osofisan

43. Chinua Achebe: Death, Where Are Thy Claws?
Niyi Osundare

A Tribute to Chinua Achebe: The Father of Modern African Literature
Eustace Palmer

45. Chinua Achebe and the Literary Compass
Ato Quayson

46. An Entire Star Has Left Us: China Achebe, In Memoriam
Tijan M. Sallah

47. Chinua Achebe’s Legacy
Véronique Tadjo

48. In Memory of Chinua Achebe
Patrick Wilmot

49. How To Write About Africa
Binyavanga Wainaina

50. Notes on Contributors

51. Notes, References and Works Cited
Index

Nana Ayebia Clarke MBE – founder of Ayebia Clarke Publishing Limited is a Ghanaian-born publisher. She was Submissions Editor of the Heinemann African Writers Series (AWS) for 12 years until 2002 when Heinemann discontinued publishing new titles in the Series. She started her own publishing imprint Ayebia with her husband David in 2003 as a way of looking to new directions. She was awarded an Honorary MBE by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for services to the British publishing industry in 2011.

James Currey worked from 1967 with Chinua Achebe on the first 100 titles in the Heinemann African Writers Series (AWS). The last title he added to the Series was No 270 African Short Stories edited by Chinua Achebe and Lyn Innes in 1985, the year in which he and Clare Currey founded James Currey Publishers.

Between them they worked on the Heinemann African Writers Series for a total of 30 years.

 

Mr Happy and The Hammer of God & Other Stories


by Martin Egblewogbe

Publication Date: 1st July 2012
ISBN:978-0-9569307-1-2
Price:£8.99

Also available on Kindle format at:



About the Book

Mr. Happy and The Hammer of God & Other Stories is a significant addition to the genre of short story writing in contemporary Ghanaian and African literature. Martin Egblewogbe is an emerging talent and if his title seems surreal, his stories are no less. The collection is divided into two parts; the first consists of seven stories and the second consists of three.

These stories are not burdened by the “African” condition and those looking for a familiar Ghanaian/African setting will have to look elsewhere and yet the reader may recognize ‘my street, my city, my people’ – because the stories are truly universal. Collectively, this book is a portrayal of inner struggles, torments and the psyche. The author asks questions by employing some familiar tropes common to all humanity - who are you, what are you, how did you get here and where do you go from here? The writer frequently turns to the metaphysical and how it relates to our minds, state of being and pursuit of happiness. He employs wit and humour to answer fundamental questions and engages us even when the outcome might be an outpouring of misery and despair.

It is altogether fitting that he chooses the short story genre to express himself because the stories sometimes end suddenly leaving the reader wanting to know more. His style is refreshing, new and entertaining. Mr. Happy and the Hammer of God & Other Stories raises the bar for emerging new talent from Africa.

Key Selling Points:

  • The author is an emerging new Ghanaian talent who is making a significant contribution to the genre of the short story.
  • His style is refreshing and experimental yet grounded in universal values.
  • The collection will appeal to a wide demography of international readers.

About the Author:

Martin Egblewogbe was born in Ghana in 1975. He has a BS.c and M.Phil in Physics and is currently working on his Ph.D at the University of Ghana, Legon where he is a lecturer in the Department of Physics. He enjoys writing short stories and poetry in his spare time and has contributed to several anthologies. He also currently hosts the radio show “Writers Project” on CitiFM in Accra, Ghana where he lives with his wife and daughter.

Dear All,

I thought I should share with you my impressions of a young Ghanaian writer, Martin Egblewogbe, whose short story collection -- Mr Happy and the Hammer of God -- I have just finished reading.  Epithets like "fresh", "imaginative" and "exciting" are often marshalled to introduce new writers, but in the case of Mr Egblewogbe I think a set of strong superlatives are in order; extraordinary, excellent, and experimentally innovative barely capture my sense of what I have read.  The short stories each conceal an enigma, sometimes of a profound existential kind, and at others merely due to some form of bafflement on the part of the protagonist of the story.  Thus after every story you are required to pause in reflection.  This also means the stories are best savoured slowly and one by one.  The influence of master spinners of narrative enigmas such as Kafka and Beckett are well in evidence in the collection.  What is perhaps most interesting about Mr Happy and the Hammer of God is that Mr Egblewogbe has devised a clever way of telling the stories so to betray only minimal geographical or and other locational markers.  There is just one story that can readily be shown to be set in Accra.  This form of placelessness thus gives the stories a universal appeal.

My favorite?  Hard to choose, but the one that made me laugh the most (yes, he also happens to have a wry sense of humour) was titled "Down Wind" and is basically about a man having to shelter from the pouring rain inside of a phone booth.  To while away the time he uses a phone card to begin phoning people he knows, apparently at random.  There are three problems that become readily evident as the story unfold: first is that the previous occupant of the phone booth happened to have filled the booth with "noisome effluvia from his nether end" (what us ordinary mortals simply call a fart!) and so he is trapped with the terrible smell inside.  The second problem is that he has an excruciating and inexplicable pain in his legs for which he seeks sympathy from the Doctor, who is the first person he calls.  Third, and perhaps most worryingly, is that one of the people he speaks to tells him he has been accused of a heinous crime and that this is to be found on the noticeboard with the glass case.  Try as he might he cannot fathom what crime it is he has committed and so spends some more time phoning other people and try to get them to tell him what is on the accusatory noticeboard.  This ends in failure. The story ends up being a parable about extreme loneliness, and we find eventually that it is not just he that is lonely, but all the other people he has just spoken to.  Another one, "Small Changes Within the Dynamic" is about a man, who having caught his wife blatantly sleeping with another man on his own bed, begins a tortured disquisition with himself about how he is going to kill her.  I will not spoil it for you by telling you how the story ends. Brilliant.

Please note that I write this without any personal knowledge of Mr Martin Egblewogbe and also from the professional perspective of someone who has taught literature for many many years and is always on the lookout for great books to read and to teach.  I strongly urge you all on this list to get hold of a copy of the book.  We may well be bearing witness to a major voice not just in Ghanaian literature, but in African and world literature as well.  Watch that space.

Ato

ps: The book is published in the UK by Ayebia publishers, but copies can be found in all the major bookshops in Accra.
pps: Mr Egblewogbe is a lecturer in the Department of Physics at the University of Ghana.
---
Ato Quayson, FGA
Professor of English and Director
Center for Diaspora and Transnational Studies
Editor, The Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature (2 volumes)
www.cambridge.org/9780521517492

Claudia Jones: Beyond Containment

Edited by Carole Boyce Davies


Publication Date: 1st July 2011
ISBN:978-0-9562401-6-3
Price:£16.99


About the Book

Claudia Jones was a smart, politically-wise, brilliant, transnational feminist, Pan Africanist theorist and cultural activist who brought together in her speeches and writings the politics that is now seen as a necessary way of intersecting a variety of political fields and positions. Known as the founder of the first London carnival and the editor of the first black newspaper The West Indian Gazette in England, Claudia Jones’s activism bridged the US and the UK with the black world politics of decolonization that ushered in contemporary community empowerment. For the first time, in one place, Claudia Jones: Beyond Containment… brings together her essays, poetry, autobiographical and longer writings, expanding our knowledge of several fields. Providing us with the clarity of the ideas of a black woman activist-intellectual of her period, for a fuller understanding of Caribbean, African American and the larger African Diaspora discourses. Claudia Jones Beyond Containment is essential reading.

Key Selling Points
• Claudia Jones’s political clarity and vision illustrated in this book demonstrates her multifaceted
approach to the struggle for equal rights in the 20th century that earned her the name ‘Mother of
the Notting Hill Carnival’.
• This book will make a valuable contribution to understanding Claudia Jones’s intellectual vision
as an inspiration for this and future generations.
• This book will appeal to Caribbean Diaspora Studies, Women’s Studies, Black Activism Studies,
African Diaspora Studies as well as the general reader.

About the Author

Carole Boyce Davies is African Diaspora Studies scholar and Professor of Africana Studies and English at Cornell University. She is author of several publications including Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones (Duke University Press, 2008). An earlier work, Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject (Routledge, 1994) is considered a theoretical base for many studies in the field of black feminist literary theory and the writing of migration. She is the general editor of The Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora (Oxford: ABC-CLIO 2008) a 3-volume encyclopedia. Dr. Boyce Davies is currently writing a series of personal reflections titled Caribbean American Spaces: Between the Twilight Zone and the Underground Railroad, dealing with the issue of transnational Caribbean/American black identity.

 

And Crocodiles Are Hungry At Night

a memoir by Jack Mapanje

Publication Date: 1st July 2011
ISBN: 978-0-9562401-7-0
Price: £12.99

Also available on Kindle format at:

 

About the Book

This book is a powerful contribution to the genre of the prison memoir in Africa. Jack Mapanje presents the moving account of a poet’s imprisonment by the state, his struggle to probe the hidden motives for this arrest and his attempt to provide an unforgettable record of the architecture of imprisonment and the perpetual struggle between the forces of truth and those of naked power.  In 1981, Jack Mapanje was a budding poet and scholar in Malawi. His first collection of poetry, Of Chameleons and Gods had just been published in the prestigious Heinemann African Writers Series and his scholarly work in linguistics was also transforming language and literary studies in Central Africa—his work was drawing international attention. But two years later the state ordered the withdrawal of Mapanje’s poetry from all schools, institutions of higher learning and bookstores. In 1987, Mapanje was arrested by the Malawian secret police and imprisoned without charge until 1991. This book is a recollection of those years in prison. Written in the tradition of the African prison memoir and often echoing the works of other famous prison graduates such as Wole Soyinka (The Man Died) and Ngugi wa Thiong’o (Detained), the memoir represents Mapanje’s retrospective attempt to explain the cause and terms of his imprisonment, to recall in tranquillity the terror of arrest, the process of incarceration and the daily struggle to hold on to some measure of sanity and spiritual freedom.

This book is a fitting tribute to the solidarity, dedication and tenacity of the British and international campaign that secured Mapanje’s release and saved his life!

Key Selling Points

  • The book will appeal to critics and scholars of African history, politics and literature. It has the potential to become a major text in the emerging field of human rights studies dealing with the literature of political incarceration.
  • Given the singularity of Mapanje’s experiences in prison and the uniqueness of his voice, this book will not be competing with others.
  • It will be favourably compared to the canonical memoirs in its field (works by Ngugi and Soyinka) and will invoke memories of South African poets in prison in the 1960s (Arthur Nortje and Dennis Brutus).


About the Author

Jack Mapanje, a Malawian poet, linguist, editor and human rights activist was formerly head of English department, university of Malawi, where he was imprisoned on 25 September 1987 by the dictator Hastings Kamuzu Banda of Malawi for 3 years, 7 months and 16 days for his dissenting views and radical poetry. On his release on 10 May 1991 he went into exile with his family in the UK. He has published five books of poetry, edited one anthology of African prison writing and co-edited two anthologies of African oral and written poetry and an African Writers’ Handbook. He is a recipient of the 1988 Rotterdam Poetry International Award, Honorary doctor of the University of Stirling, the 2002 African Literature Association (ALA, USA) Fonlon-Nichols Award and Fellow of University College London. He was a visiting scholar at the University of York, taught creative writing in the School of English, University of Leeds and the School of English, Newcastle University. He is currently a visiting professor in the Faculty of Arts, York St John University.

Review

It is sobering that the prison memoir is one of the most consistent products of contemporary African writers. In 1987 the Malawian poet and scholar Jack Mapanje, then teaching at Chancellor College of the University of Malawi, was arrested and imprisoned without charge – an incarceration that was to last for three-and-a-half years. This experience has been chronicled in Mapanje’s poetry (see, for instance, The Chattering Wagtails of Mikuyu Prison, in Heinemann’s African Writing Series) and in the same series Mapanje edited Gathering Seaweed: African Prison Writing gathering together material from everyone from Kwame Nkrumah and Jomo Kenyatta, to Wole Soyinka and Ngugi wa Thiong’o. Now Mapanje’s own long-awaited memoir is published – ‘A chronicle of a poet’s imprisonment under life president Banda of Malawi’. When Mapanje was released from prison, he and his family left Malawi and he has never substantially resettled in his home country. The gestation of this memoir is remarkable. The years of imprisonment are recorded in intimate detail, conversations, activities, personalities, in a manner that would suggest that the writer was keeping a daily written chronicle – which, of course, he had no means or possibility of doing. In fact Mapanje reconstructed those traumatic days, from a certain necessary distance in time and via recreating the experience in question and answer sessions with students and colleagues in the UK, the Netherlands and Ireland, rebuilding the awful memory. An impressive quality of the memoir is Mapanje’s resolute optimism, making the smallest incidents vehicles of hope rather than despair. Beyond the suffering of Banda’s political prisoners recorded here, Mapanje shows the awful paranoia created by his dictatorship, with police, academics and civil servants terrified of being thought to be disloyal to ‘his excellency, the life president, the Ngwazi Dr H Kamuzu Banda’. Mapanje, in a bizarre episode, notes that even his presence at a gathering of linguistics scholars in Harare, was regarded as being potentially subversive.

To welcome prison memoirs seems perverse. But Mapanje’s should be read by all who believe in the power of the human spirit to overcome evil.
Martin Banham
University of Leeds
Review appeared in the Leeds African Studies Bulletin February 2012

Some important blurb endorsements for Jack Mapanje’s book

And Crocodiles Are Hungry at Night: A chronicle of a poet’s imprisonment under life president Banda of Malawi

Jack Mapanje’s memoir not only chronicles his imprisonment, it also sets out how the life of a young poet and academic is viciously destroyed by the absence of academic freedom. Brilliantly crafted, with a touch of humour even in grim circumstances, this is a moving contribution to the growing world literature of incarceration. As such it has universal appeal.
Lady Antonia Fraser DBE Vice-President (former President) English PEN

Jack Mapanje’s imprisonment without trial or charge was the subject of protests by linguists, writers, academics, human rights organizations and lovers of freedom throughout the world. Apart from being an ordinary prison memoir, the writer offers us a rare glimpse on how inner circles operate in repressive regimes, in order to protect themselves and the despots they serve. This work is crafted with passion, cheek and wry humour. But it is a necessary warning to future African and other world leaders to care about the people who vote them into power. It is also a testimony to the efforts of those who fight for prisoners of conscience throughout the world. A long awaited and much welcome contribution to the growing world literature of political incarceration.
Noam Chomsky Emeritus Professor of Linguistics and Philosophy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (
MIT), USA.

This book is a powerful contribution to the genre of the prison memoir in Africa. Jack Mapanje presents the moving account of a poet’s imprisonment by the state, his struggle to probe the hidden motives for this arrest and his attempt to provide an unforgettable record of the architecture of imprisonment and the perpetual struggle between the forces of truth and those of naked power. In 1981, Jack Mapanje was a budding poet and scholar in Malawi. His first collection of poetry, Of Chameleons and Gods had just been published in the prestigious African Writers Series and his scholarly work in linguistics was also transforming language and literary studies in Central Africa—his work was drawing international attention. But two years later the state ordered the withdrawal of Mapanje’s poetry from all schools, institutions of higher learning and bookstores. In 1987, Mapanje was arrested by the Malawian secret police and imprisoned without charge until 1991. This book is a recollection of those years in prison. Written in the tradition of the African prison memoir and often echoing the works of other famous prison graduates such as Wole Soyinka The Man Died and Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Detained, the memoir represents Mapanje’s retrospective attempt to explain the cause and terms of his imprisonment, to recall in tranquility the terror of arrest, the process of incarceration and the daily struggle to hold on to some measure of sanity and spiritual freedom.
Dr Simon Gikandi, Robert Schirmer Professor of English, Princeton University, USA.

Mapanje’s memoir powerfully recounts the human will to survival as well as the capacity to confound even the most repressive and highly organized regime of surveillance and offers an important historical resource of Post-colonial Malawi. It has the intensity of Soyinka’s The Man Died, the moral and political purpose of Ngugi’s Detained and the anguished, but immensely hopeful tone of Vera Chirwa’s Fearless Fighter.
Dr Mpalive-Hangson Msiska, Reader in English and Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
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Film Fiction Theatre Art Poetry Guest
Dundee University Review of Arts, Dundee university


The memoir And Crocodiles are Hungry at Night is a powerful and compelling account of poet and academic Jack Mapanje’s experiences of Malawian prison and the effect this incarceration had on him and his family. In 1987, Mapanje was imprisoned for over three years by the authoritarian regime of Malawian President Hastings Banda, never once being informed of the details of his ‘crimes’ against the state. The memoir is Mapanje’s attempt to come to terms with his ordeal and to uncover the truth about his arrest. This, however, is not simply a prison memoir. Throughou


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